Press

Great Bay Community College, Portsmouth, NH

Gateway Gallery

CURRENT EXHIBIT

Exhibit Runs: September 17th - November 26th 
Opening reception: Thursday October 4, 2018, 5-7 PM​ Catered by the Greenbean.

Materiality: Between Thought and Presence​ exhibiting at Great Bay Community College Gateway Gallery Portsmouth

 

The Gateway Gallery at Great Bay Community College is proud to present Materiality: Between Thought and Presence, a collection of full size, kinetic graphite drawings of animals by Gretchen Woodman. The exhibition will run from September 17 to November 26, 2018. The public is invited to join us on Thursday, October 4th from 5-7 PM for an opening reception. 

Woodman is a contemporary realist whose drawings and paintings represent the enigma of the human-animal relationship.  Sometimes humorous, but more often serious, her work leans toward the side of the animal. 

As lifelong native of NH, she earned her BFA from the University of NH and her MFA from the NH Institute of Art.  She has participated in group shows at Indiana University, John James Audubon Center in Pennsylvania, Cape Cod Museum of Art, Eastern Kentucky University, Frontline Arts in New Jersey, as well as several shows in New Hampshire. This is her fourth solo exhibition.

Information on each artist and their work can be found in the gallery.

The Gateway Gallery is located inside the atrium entrance of Great Bay Community College at 320 Corporate Drive, Portsmouth, NH 03801 and features the work of local New England artists. Contact Annette Cohen at acohen@ccsnh.edu 603-427-7665 with any questions.

 

TWIGGS Gallery, Boscawen, NH

The latest exhibit at the Twiggs Gallery will be “Intertwined: Nature, Chaos, Hope...” An opening artists’ reception will be Thursday from 5 to 7 p.m. It will be on display through Oct. 28.

Tracy Hayes, Victoria Hussey, William Turner and Gretchen Woodman became friends while pursuing MFA degrees at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. In their conversations, they discovered a shared interest in culture, humanity and ecology.

The artists in the exhibit have created works that explore the duality of nature: the delicate fragility and powerful forces of the natural world.

Woodman’s work explores the human and animal relationship. Turner portrays nature’s force decomposing the man-made machine crumbling to rust and moss. Hussey’s mixed-media landscapes show organic forms and elemental forces. Hayes’ images suggest a behind-the-scenes view of nature overcoming human chaos.

For more information, visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com.

MILL BROOK Gallery and Sculpture Garden

Playful and haunting

Artists' creations decorate Mill Brook's indoor galleries and span the landscape

BY LISA BROWN
SPECIAL TO THE UNION LEADER May 02. 2018 12:56PM

 

Sculptor Michael Alfano's “Stroke of Genius” is part of the spring/summer exhibit now open at the Mill Brook Gallery and Sculpture Garden in Concord. 

If you go...

WHAT: Spring/Summer Exhibition

WHERE: Mill Brook Gallery and Sculpture Garden, 236 Hopkinton Road, Concord

WHEN: Thursday through Sept. 2

COST: Free

INFO: millbrookgallery.com or 226-2046


Mill Brook Gallery and Sculpture Garden is unveiling an exhibit on Saturday that promises to be thoughtful, haunting and playful.

Mill Brook’s uniqueness is that it is a gallery both indoors and outdoors, all within the city limits of Concord. There are three show rooms inside and a sprawling outdoor sculpture gallery featuring the work of more than 70 artists from around New England. 

The gallery and sculpture garden were founded in 1996 by artist and art teacher Pam Tarbell.

“There are incredible artists in your own backyard, and people don’t realize this. Ironically, the hardest people to get out here are the people from Concord,” says Tarbell. “Years ago, when teaching art classes after school, I realized there was very little art here for my students to see in the state capital.”

Tarbell has created the perfect venue for one to discover art in a peaceful and nurturing environment. Mill Brook sits on a rural country horse farm with perennial gardens, fields and ponds. A long linger through the property is almost a guarantee.

“This is where art and nature meet,” says Tarbell.

Exhibiting artists

New Hampshire artist Gretchen Hill Woodman, one of the featured artists in the spring/summer showcase at Mill Brook, explores human and animal relationships through her paintings. Her pieces are statements, some profound, others haunting and yet full of beauty.

Woodman’s work involves explorations in many media: charcoal; colored pencil and pastel on paper or panel; acrylic paint on acetate; photography; and small mixed-media objects and installations. 

Woodman’s focus is on humans’ interaction with animals.

“I try to create an emotional connection with the animals,” says Woodman. “Some of my images are faces of animals, and they engage the viewer to look back at them, in the eye, in a sort of equality. I want the viewer to see the animal as an equal.”

In many of Woodman’s paintings there are subtle statements about the environment. “Greenling,” a graphite powder-on-paper piece, is one of them.

“‘Greenling’ is a polar bear in a fish bowl. It is a reference to space and habitat,” Woodman says. “The bear is running out of room to live and is stuck with nowhere to go.”

HEALING NATURE: Human Vision, Art & the Environment

Together we hope to create in this exhibition, a little cosmos, a platform to observe nature keenly, to ask questions about the earth’s systems and to make commitments that these inspirations will continue to make life rich for those that follow us. – Juror Mark Adams


“Because the beauty and diversity of Cape Cod’s natural environment is integral to the life of Cape Codders and to so much of the deeply felt work of our artists, the Museum is putting this Spring’s spotlight on nature’s importance and its connections to art both locally and nationally in two exhibits,” said Angela Bilski, interim operating director of Cape Cod Museum of Art. (CCMoA)

 

Preserving the Very Nature of Cape Cod, in collaboration with the Association to Preserve Cape Cod (APCC), is currently on exhibit through May 20, 2018, and the national juried show, Healing Nature: Human Vision, Art & the Environment exhibit is on view from March 29 through May 27 with a public reception on April 5. More than 700 diverse artworks expressing the artist’s relationship to the natural world or their response to issues confronting the environment were submitted for Healing Nature from around the country.

 

Juror Mark Adams, a cartographer/geologist with Cape Cod National Seashore and a painter, selected the work of 56 artists for the show which includes painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture. The awards of $500 for the Most Fitting Theme, $250 Jurors Choice Award and Honorable Mention will be announced at the reception on April 5. Seven of the artists are from Cape Cod: Craig Brodt, Centerville; Eileen Casey, Sandwich; Peter Coes, Cummaquid; Jane Paradise, Provincetown; Victoria Schuh, Barnstable; Lew Schwartz, Wellfleet, and Laurence Young, Provincetown.

Adams remarked:

“Artists are keen observers, participating deeply in the natural world, from the micro-world of the garden to the seafloors and wildernesses that we must strive to reach. The submissions were powerful and ranged from the subtle to the dramatic. I was drawn particularly to work that came from a direct experience of the natural world.

 

“The themes of connection and healing and nature’s importance are all represented here, sometimes in intangible ways using visual languages that provoke questions and illuminate how the world works. Together we hope to create in this exhibition, a little cosmos, a platform to observe nature keenly, to ask questions about the earth’s systems and to make commitments that these inspirations will continue to make life rich for those that follow us.”

Gretchen Woodman of Nottingham, New Hampshire, represented by her drawing, Precious, explores human/animal relationships. She says that by investigating the essence of the animal through visual art, she creates emotional connections to animals and that “by fostering a caring attitude toward all living beings, we connect more closely to our earth and each other."

​​

Mark Adams - Juror’s statement: 

The idea of “healing nature” reads both ways. It could signify nature’s power to heal us through our immersive experiences in the world but it also reads as a strong admonition, with “healing” as a word of action. Artists are keen observers, participating deeply in the natural world, from the micro-world of the garden to the seafloors and wildernesses that we must strive to reach. The submissions were powerful and ranged from the subtle to the dramatic. First and foremost, I looked for visually strong and moving images. I was drawn particularly to work that came from a direct experience of the natural world. Also, works that expressed a human connection to our place in the natural world stood out. In art, there needn’t be an explicit message or an editorial — no matter how much the world needs all our articulate images to bring us closer to harmony with the environment. The themes of connection and healing and nature’s importance are all represented here, sometimes in intangible ways using visual languages that provoke questions and illuminate how the world works. Congratulations to all the artists for their accomplished work. It was gratifying to bring together such a diverse collection — from photography to printmaking to painting to sculpture. Together we hope to create in this exhibition, a little cosmos, a platform to observe nature keenly, to ask questions about the earth’s systems and to make commitments that these inspirations will continue to make life rich for those that follow us.

Mark Adams is a cartographer/ geologist with the Cape Cod National Seashore and a painter represented by the Schoolhouse Gallery in Provincetown. His work was the subject of a 2017 retrospective at the Provincetown Art Association. He has exhibited in New England since the 1980s and lives in North Truro.

RECONFIGURATION

GRETCHEN HILL WOODMAN

Nov. 3-27

42 Maple Contemporary Art Center is delighted to welcome New Hampshire artist, Gretchen Hill Woodman to the gallery for the month of November with an opening reception on Friday, November 3rd from 7pm to 9pm. Woodman received her BFA from the University of New Hampshire and went on to obtain a Master's Degree in Fine Art from the NH Institute of Art after a long career as an art teacher.

Woodman creates drawings, paintings, and mixed media works to explore human/animal relationships in two ways. She researches issues within the field of human-animal studies to generate concepts to explore visually. In addition, she seeks the essence of the animal through visual means to create emotional connections to animals.

Woodman's work involves explorations in many mediums: charcoal, colored pencil and pastel on paper or panel, acrylic paint on acetate, photography and small mixed-media objects and installations. 
She wishes to make room in the human mind for animals to be perceived as equally deserving of environment, safety, and respect.  

CONVERGENCE OF SOULS:
THREE INTERPRETATIONS, THREE STYLES

Tracy Hayes, William C. Turner, and Gretchen Woodman

Exhibition: August 29, 2017 – October 6, 2017

Fort Point Arts Community (FPAC) Gallery

300 Summer Street M1

Boston, MA 02210

William Turner, Tracy Hayes and Gretchen Woodman became friends while taking art classes at NH Institute of Art in Manchester, NH.  During many conversations, the three realized their common interests in culture, humanity, ecology and wildlife.  While Woodman pairs human objects with animals in a suggestively painful manner, Turner portrays nature decomposing the man-made machine; crumbling industry into rust and moss.  Hayes’s images are suggestive of a process underlying Turner’s decomposition; a behind-the-scenes view of nature winning over human chaos.  Collectively, this convergence of works presents a vision of hope for the future of all life.

100 Market Street Exhibit    Sept. 1 through Nov. 15, 2017

100 Market St.

Portsmouth, NH

Nine of Gretchen Woodman's pieces will be on display at 100 Market Street for the Fall 2017 Season.  The theme of the show is "Dark Arts/Light Arts".  Gretchen has created four new pieces based on this theme.  The new pieces are on display on the main floor of the building.

The Gallery at WREN

Bethlehem, NH

On Friday, July 1, from 5-7pm the Gallery at WREN presents the opening reception of EYELINES, a solo exhibition of paintings, illustrations and objects by New Hampshire native Gretchen Woodman. 


Connecting her interests in art and social science, including new branches of sociology, called Human Animal Studies and Anthrozoology, Woodman’s work addresses human practices and beliefs as they relate to other living beings. Through her investigations, she challenges our homocentric view of animals, and explores ways to close the empathetic void between non-human and human suffering.

“The work is, in a word, stunning,” says Gallery Coordinator, Katherine Ferrier. “The combination of large scale, attention to the finest detail, and the insistence on direct eye contact with the animals invites viewers into surprising relationships with the animals, creating a palpable space of empathy in which to re-imagine how we go about sharing the world with creatures great and small.

EYELINES includes works in charcoal, colored pencil and pastel on paper, acrylic paint on acetate, as well as photography and small mixed-media installations. The exhibit is generously sponsored by Leigh B. Starer Design, and will run through the month of July. The Gallery at WREN is open daily 10am-5pm.

Comments from Muybridgeshorse.com

At the Living With Animals conference last month, I had the chance to briefly meet and look at the beautiful book Enchanting Cervidae by artist Gretchen Hill Woodman. Gretchen’s work stood out to me, particularly Overtaken, a mixed media piece depicting a brilliantly colored deer against a bright white background, and embellished with designs reminiscent of carousel animals (I’m thinking of work by Tim Racer). Gretchen’s charcoal drawings, sometimes including colored pencil, watercolor, pastel, and graphite, move beyond traditional animal portraits. My favorites are the pieces that show “the animal affected by human constructs,” literal representations of the ways our manmade tools and constructs affect animal life. Looking at this work, I find myself thinking of Michael Zavros’s falling horse drawings and Josh Keyes’s paintings, some favorites of mine.